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Welcome to the 2022 “sCYence Fair” organized by The Cyprus Institute, co-organised by the Municipality of Aglantzia and under the auspices of the Minister of Education, Culture, Sports and Youth, which will take place on 15th and 16th April at Skali Agalantzias.

“sCYence Fair 2022” lasts two days and is dedicated to the promotion of science, technology and innovation. This is an initiative of The Cyprus Institute which aims to encourage the participation of young people in scientific fields, as well as the support to the next generation of scientists in Cyprus.

The public will have the opportunity to get a first taste on the scientific research that The Cyprus Institute produces, to attend in relevant lectures, while our little friends can participate in competitions for the best presentation.

Free entrance!

 

Friday, 15th April       |      09:30 - 17:00

09:30             Welcoming Addresses and Greetings by the organizers and officials

09:30 - 17:00Presentations of Primary-Gymnasium-Lyceum Students in Booths

USRL

The USRL provides unique opportunities for atmospheric research, as well as for investigation of Earth-surface properties/characteristics, using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The USRL UAVs are regularly utilized for air pollution and air quality monitoring. Among the USRL activities, are included the forest surveillance for fire-risk prevention and the 3D mapping of archaeological sites and cultural heritage monuments. During the last two years, USRL has focused on the development of a new, customized system for the navigation of UAVs, comprised of a ground control station software and a flight controller.

This system will be presented during the Researchers’ Night in operation, via a flight simulator. In addition, part of the USRL unmanned aerial vehicles’ fleet, scientific equipment that is installed in the UAVs for research purposes and the latest USRL research activities, will be demonstrated via audio-visual media.

Insectopia

Learn how to become a citizen scientist: Learn about the fitcount, inaturalist and mosquito alert (mobile apps) and help scientists in their research for investigating climate change impacts!

 

 

 

Your Ancestors

Have you ever wondered how archaeologists know so much about our ancestors? Come explore the latest and most advanced techniques in science and technology for the study of ancient human remains and find out! Synchrotron radiation facilities can be thought of as enormous 3D microscopes, like Swiss army knives for science, that allow us to peek into the internal structures and chemistry of bones, teeth, hair and skin down to the nanoscale. From this we are able to gain insights into all aspects of individual life in the past such as health, age and even lifestyle.

Learn about the lives of the ancients through our interactive life stories. What will you see when you look through the microscope?

Renewable Energy Sources

PROTEAS (Platform for Research, Observation and Technological Applications in Solar Energy) is an important infrastructure for research, development and testing of technologies related to solar energy collection (CSP) and seawater desalination. This facility is an experimental unit specializing in developing CSP systems suitable for island and coastal environments, with particular emphasis on small units (<25 MWth) with large storage. These units are ideal for remote areas or areas connected to low power grids. The first major experiment carried out at the PROTEAS unit concerns the development of a pilot / experimental scale infrastructure for the cogeneration of electricity and desalination of seawater using solar energy.

After successfully completing the first experiment, the facility was upgraded with the installation of additional forms of renewable energy sources, such as photovoltaics and wind turbines, to carry out the next major research project on multi-generation from renewable energy sources. The main goal is to allow storing and using power without operational interruption both on and off the grid. Finally, the unit has two pilot units from two international industries (one Czech specializing in the CSP sector and one American in the desalination sector). Both are fully integrated into the existing infrastructure.

The Human Skeleton

How active were our ancestrors? What were their dietary habits like, how healthy were there and how mobile? All this information can be extracted from the human skeleton, using appropriate research tools. ‘The human skeleton: a window to the past’ includes different activities for an audience aged 5 to 15 years. These activities will show you what an osteoarchaeologist’s job looks like from the stage of excavation to the stage of laboratory analysis. In specific, you will learn the main principles of an archaeological excavation.

Subsequently, you will have the opportunity to determine if a human skeleton belongs to a man or a woman, how old he/she was, how active and whether he/she suffered from any diseases, exactly as an osteoarchaeologist does in the lab.

How Does Water Flow

When water flows from the mountains to the plains, it converges or diverges based on the shape of landforms. The distribution of water leads to watersheds which play an important role in our agro-ecosystems and determine the availability of water resources. The dynamic behavior of watersheds is demonstrated with an interactive augmented reality sandbox, where participants are able to change landforms and explore in real time the importance of water relative to the study of hydrology and earth sciences.

Furthermore, researchers will demonstrate how irrigation scheduling and water conservation can be achieved with the use of soil moisture sensors. Audiovisual material will also broadcast smart recipes and procedures to adapt our water resources and cities to climate change.

Zoo-Archaeology

Almost wherever we dig, we find animal bones. Why are there so many in the soil? What happened to the animals they once belonged to? What can they tell us about the life of humans in the past? Zooarchaeology is the key with which we can unlock the knowledge hidden in the ancient animal remains, answer these questions and many more. With a set of fun activities, suitable for both children and adults, there is ample opportunity for first-hand experience in being an archaeologist specialised on animal remains, in other words a zoo-archaeologist!

The activities involve discovering bones and teeth, handling them, guessing which body part it is, which animals they belonged to and how people interacted with those animals. All activities are practical and interactive, such as excavating and handling animal remains, with handouts and visual aids to practical work. The aim is to show the practical aspects of zooarchaeology, as well as the knowledge produced by it. All activities are conducted by experts, which offers opportunities for further discussion and learning.

U-Solve

U-SOLVE is a one-of a kind, European funded project that calls for ‘creative’ ideas and solutions to urban sustainable challenges. The implementation of the United Nations ‘Sustainable Development Goals’ in urban areas is of outmost importance for making our cities sustainable, liveable and resilient over the long term. The U-SOLVE project and its framework are simultaneously being implemented in 6 Mediterranean countries (Italy, Greece, Cyprus, Jordan, Palestine, Egypt) and intends to create the right conditions and ecosystems in these geographical areas for sustainable change.

In Cyprus and having as a ‘place-based’ focus the city of Nicosia, U-SOLVE’s representatives CyI and UCY have managed, through various different activities and initiatives, to study and understand the urban business and entrepreneurial environment. This study has allowed for the exposure and documentation of the most pressing and serious urban sustainable challenges that require urgent attention and action. Focusing on three Urban Domains – Waste Management, Energy and Built Environment, Urban Fabric Design – the Project is looking for ‘creative’ ideas and solutions, mainly from young people and women entrepreneurs, that can support new and/or existing efforts for sustainable and integrated territorial development. Interesting aspect of U-SOLVE is the attention it gives to creative industries and representatives.

The Project’s framework depends on entrepreneurial and innovative people from the creative industries to think of solutions that can positively influence behaviours and a culture that is resistant to change. In addition to ideas and solutions, the Project aims to generate and establish a number of urban hubs. These hubs will represent a powerful tool, at Mediterranean level, where local policy-makers, knowledge providers, development agencies, innovators and impact investors will come together and act as a community for change, producing economic value within a sustainable development framework. Entrepreneurial ideas and experimental pathways resulting from U-SOLVE related interventions will transform into successful, long-lived businesses that are fully supported by governmental entities. These businesses and their offerings are the sustainable development solutions that cities like Nicosia are looking for and need.

Illuminating Emissions

Illuminating Emissions: Simulating a Model Grid Using Mobiles How does modelling work to inform us about air quality, and short-lived and greenhouse gas pollutants? Visitors can use the light from their mobiles to illuminate the emissions from a stencilled projection of Cyprus, and explore the projections at different scales. Accompanied by a chart to interpret the results, this activity will introduce visitors to the capabilities and limitations of mathematical models to simulate air pollution that serve as the platform for gathering data in weather, air quality and long-term climate activities.

Untangling Emissions: Using Data and Yarn to Build a 3-D Emissions Web Where do different pollutants and greenhouse gases come from? Emissions are constantly produced by all of our activities¬; from the cars we drive, to the crops we grow and the livestock we raise. In order to model and interpret emissions for the purposes of understanding our atmosphere in both the short and the long term, scientists must first determine the type and size of emissions from different sources. Visitors can use various colourful threads to help construct a 3-D Emission Web that traces pollutants back to their various sources. This activity will help visitors visualize the inventories atmospheric scientists use daily to inform us about our weather, climate, and health.

Modelling the Real WorldThe basic pillars of science are theory and experiment. Theoretical studies are also facilitated by simulations or ‘computer experiments’. Simulations allow us to study phenomena in greater detail at a reduced cost. For example, for any material (gas, liquid or solid), we can compute important properties and its behaviour under varying conditions by simulating it in different time and size scales, ranging from the quantum- to the macro- world. Despite this, with an increase in the demand for more technologically advanced materials, more detailed simulations are needed which in turn require more computational power.

Simulations can run for several months, but with the use of supercomputers, we can ‘split’ the computational problem in parallel processors, making calculations much faster. Finally, by simulating using various parameters which may be nearly impossible to do with real experiments (mainly due to exorbitant costs), we can optimize products (e.g. strength of new materials).

 

The Digital Library for the History and Culture of Dress in Cyprus

The DIGITAL LIBRARY for the HISTORY AND CULTURE of DRESS in CYPRUS facilitates the study and dissemination of the history of the Cypriot dress in its broader socioeconomic and cultural context. Dress in Cyprus includes the apparel of the Greek Cypriots, who represent the majority of the population, as well that of the Turkish Cypriots and the Armenian community in Cyprus.

Utilizing the available written, visual and material evidence, primary focus is given to the periods of Ottoman and British rule in Cyprus. During this time the development of Cypriot dress mirrored aspects of the cultural identity, the daily life and the socioeconomic aspirations of the various strata of Cypriot society as they transitioned between the insular realities of Ottoman Cyprus and the island’s gradual Europeanization in the colonial context of the British Empire.

The use of advanced digital technologies and applications offers a unique approach to an important aspect of Cypriot Cultural Heritage. The project is an integral part of the framework of Dioptra, the Cyprus Institute’s digital library for Cypriot Culture. This is the first comprehensive attempt to utilize the great opportunities offered in the field of Digital Cultural Heritage for the study and dissemination of the history of dress in Cyprus. The public will be able to approach the digital documentation, 2D and 3D imaging and database applications that contributes to the creation of a web-based digital platform that virtually narrates and explores the cultural development of the Cypriot dress.

Visiting an Ancient Cypriot Field

The main aim of the proposed activity is the exploration of the plants’ presence in ancient Cyprus. The participants will learn which types of domesticated plants were used; how the ancient Cypriots treated them- from their planting and harvesting to their processing for storage and meal preparation. The children will also learn which food combinations did the ancient people and which was their favorite foodstuff to eat either as a snack or as a main dish.

The participants will have the opportunity to explore Cypriot plant remains found in archaeological sites of the island using a stereomicroscope. They will also be able to go through atlases devoted to Cypriot flora and recognize already known to them plants as well as introduce themselves to new species. Before they leave our booth, they will be asked to draw a sketch or even compose a brief story presenting their experience after visiting the ancient Cypriot landscape. We hope that through their visit to the archaeobotanical booth they will have not only gained a glimpse of the past Cypriot flora, past diet but also they will be able to compare the past with the modern diet and underline differences and similarities.

Cypriot Medieval Graffitti

The workshop of the Cyprus Institute “Medieval Graffiti in Cyprus: history scratched on the walls” aims to raise awareness about the presence and the relevance of the Medieval graffiti of Cyprus. Visitors will have the opportunity to explore past people’s messages recorded on church walls, to see how researchers document and study them applying innovative technologies to recover the graffiti meaning and value.

Through different activities, visitors will get closer to graffiti creation, documentation, and interpretation, learning about a usually unexplored aspect of the rich Cypriot cultural heritage.

Computational Based Science

In the last decades, with the rise of computers and their complexity in terms of architecture (with the largest of them being called supercomputers) and computational power, scientists have been enabled to use tools to complement and many times replace the laboratory experiments.

We want to take you on a trip from the first computers (abacus in Ancient Greece) to applications in the modern (pre-exascale and quantum era) through simple computational experiments. We will demonstrate how a supercomputer and a quantum computer can perform complex calculations applicable to a variety of scientific domains from unlocking our very existence through Lattice QCD simulations to designing materials. Did you know that we compute pi through the use of random numbers? Or how fast a supercomputer can calculate? Join us in this superquantumcomputing adventure! We promise you it will be Crayzy (supercomputing pun there)!

Cyprus Amateur Radio Society

Our aim is to promote the involvement of youth in STEM subjects by providing a real-life example of how STEM can be applied in an easy and fun way from the comfort of one’s home. Through amateur radio the study and further development of the art of wireless communications is promoted. We shall setup the following experiments:

  1. An HF radio station that will be used to communicate world-wide, and at the same time demonstrate how and what factors affect radio wave propagation through the ionosphere, by observing in real-time the reach of our signals from the sCYence fair.
  2. A mock satellite will be ‘flown’ above the Scyence fair, which shall wirelessly transmit telemetry information (and possibly photographs) to an earth station, and visitors will have the opportunity to witness how a satellite ground station works, using cheap and off-the-shelf materials readily available.
  3. A web-browser based electronic training application that aims to help people learn the Morse Code in an entertaining and fun way.
  4. A simulation of a ‘Slow-Scan TV’ station will be setup, which shall allow visitors to observe how the initial pictures from the moon were sent to earth during the Apollo moon landings. For those who wish, they may even have the opportunity to send their own pictures.

The activities will be coordinated by Nestor Jacovides. More info related to the CYPRUS AMATEUR RADIO SOCIETY (CARS) are available here

Physics Decathlon

The Physics Decathlon is an experiential activity with ten interesting Physics experiments for young and old. Each experiment ("race") has a measurable result. Thus, visitors can experiment and check how well they do in these experimental activities and, at the same time, learn about concepts and laws of Physics.

The activity has a competitive character in two categories: group category (in which groups of students with a maximum number of 5 members participate) and individual category (in which any visitor of the Festival can participate). Teams and individuals compete in interesting experimental Physics activities with measurable results and, depending on the result, get points. At the end of the Festival, the champion team in the team category and the champion in the individual category will be announced. The winners receive a small prize, related to Physics. Visitors who do not wish to take part in the competition can simply try the experiments while attending the Physics Decade booth.

Indicatively, some of the Physics Decathlon competitions are:

  • Needle Balance: Participants should balance as many needles on the head of a needle as possible.
  • Transfer of balls with an overturned glass: Participants should transfer from the table to a glass 10 balls (one ball at a time) using another glass, which, however, must be constantly inverted.
  • Lifting a clip with a magnet: Participants should lift a clip that is tied to the end of a thread as high as they can using a magnet with the restriction that the magnet does not touch the clip).
  • Sphere Emergence: Participants must raise a metal sphere from the bottom of a closed test tube filled with sand to the surface of the sand, without opening the tube (and without using a magnet!
  • Balance pins in water: Participants should place 20 pins on the surface of the water in a glass so that the pins do not sink.

 

Educational Robotics

General introduction to the field of robotics and the fields in which it finds application in everyday life with reference to educational robotics (STEAM) which includes the sciences Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics as well as the benefits it offers. There will also be an introduction to the practical part as educational robotics combines the model of Experiential Learning. Experiential Learning helps students find solutions by using their hands while activating most of their brain, as recent research shows. At this point students will be able to build and program robots with the appropriate instruction of the instructor. Students will get their hands on basic parts of a robot such as engines, sensors, etc. They will then assemble and build some of the attached structures and program them via tablet.

The activity is coordinated by Gregoris Hadjilarkou (Mechanical Engineer, Department of Mechanical and Construction Engineering) and Foivos Hadjilarkou (Electrical Engineer - Energy Technologies and Sustainable Design).

Demonstration of Robotics Challenges of the Robotex Competition by the Cyprus Computer Society

Robotex Pancyprian Robotics Competition is an annual event organized by the Cyprus Computer Society with the support of public and private organizations, in accordance with the respective International competition.

At the sCYence Fair booth, representatives of Robo.com.cy and Engino, both partners of CCS and sponsors of Robotex Cyprus, will present examples of the challenges of the popular competition, which this year will take place on 24-26 June 2022, information at www.robotex.org.cy

eTwinning

eTwinning offers a platform for staff (teachers, head teachers, librarians, etc.), working in a school in one of the European countries involved, to communicate, collaborate, develop projects, share and, in short, feel and be part of the most exciting learning community in Europe. eTwinning is co-funded by the Erasmus+, the European programme for Education, Training, Youth and Sport.

 

 

Nutty Scientists

The Nutty Scientists are thrilled to participate with the scientific show called the “Ice Age Show”, which aims to awaken the curiosity of children towards science subjects using fun experiments with Carbonic Ice such as “Dark mist”, “Fill the Bottle”, “Rising Bubbles”, “The High-Pitche Ladle”, “Boom!”, “A Foam Bath” and more…
The kids will help our scientists over-come incredible challenges within the secret forest of Merlin the Wizard by performing amazing experiments. They will learn about the amazing properties of CO2 and dry ice getting to know about sublimation, chemical reactions, pressure, density, weight, osmosis and more…

The show will take place in the inside room of Skali Aglantzias and it will be free of charge, as part of the Nutty Scientists Cyprus support to the sCYence Fair 2022. Limited sitting will be available so mark your calendars to join us!

Nutty Scientists

Space exploration is experiencing a new golden age, with fascinating developments and projects that seem like science fiction. A presentation on humanity's future plans and Moon colonisation, as well the significant role played by our country in the field of space exploration.

The lecture will be delivered by George A. Danos, President, Cyprus Space Exploration Organisation (CSEO), Vice-Chair, Panel on Innovative Solutions, International Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) Academician, International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) Honorary Member, International Astronomical Union (IAU) President, Parallel Parliament for Entrepreneurship, Republic of Cyprus.

Nutty Scientists

Eleni Charitonos, the 1st Cypriot analogue astronaut, will be joining us at the #SCYF2022 to share everything about her experiences!

The analog space missions and training, but also how she achieved her goals from such a young age. After her first analog astronaut mission at LunAres, which lasted 19 days, she completed a 33-day long mission at HI-SEAS, on the volcano Mauna Loa in Hawaii.

Eleni Charitonos is officially working towards becoming an astronaut and is currently pursuing her undergraduate degree in Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Glasgow. Eleni’s passion for space has led her to establish the “Glasgow University Students for the Exploration and Development of Space” - the first student society in the UK conducting research on the “Development of a Human Civilization on Mars”.

Eleni is the Deputy Manager of the 6th European Space Generation Workshop that’s happening for the 1st time in Cyprus in April 2022, and a Reports Designer at the Space Generation Advisory Council. Her contribution to the space community was honoured with the National UKSEDS “Student of the year” award.

 


 

Saturday, 16th April       |      10:00 - 17:00

10:00 - 17:00Presentations of Primary-Gymnasium-Lyceum Students in Booths

USRL

The USRL provides unique opportunities for atmospheric research, as well as for investigation of Earth-surface properties/characteristics, using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The USRL UAVs are regularly utilized for air pollution and air quality monitoring. Among the USRL activities, are included the forest surveillance for fire-risk prevention and the 3D mapping of archaeological sites and cultural heritage monuments. During the last two years, USRL has focused on the development of a new, customized system for the navigation of UAVs, comprised of a ground control station software and a flight controller.

This system will be presented during the Researchers’ Night in operation, via a flight simulator. In addition, part of the USRL unmanned aerial vehicles’ fleet, scientific equipment that is installed in the UAVs for research purposes and the latest USRL research activities, will be demonstrated via audio-visual media.

Insectopia

Learn how to become a citizen scientist: Learn about the fitcount, inaturalist and mosquito alert (mobile apps) and help scientists in their research for investigating climate change impacts!

 

 

 

Your Ancestors

Have you ever wondered how archaeologists know so much about our ancestors? Come explore the latest and most advanced techniques in science and technology for the study of ancient human remains and find out! Synchrotron radiation facilities can be thought of as enormous 3D microscopes, like Swiss army knives for science, that allow us to peek into the internal structures and chemistry of bones, teeth, hair and skin down to the nanoscale. From this we are able to gain insights into all aspects of individual life in the past such as health, age and even lifestyle.

Learn about the lives of the ancients through our interactive life stories. What will you see when you look through the microscope?

Renewable Energy Sources

PROTEAS (Platform for Research, Observation and Technological Applications in Solar Energy) is an important infrastructure for research, development and testing of technologies related to solar energy collection (CSP) and seawater desalination. This facility is an experimental unit specializing in developing CSP systems suitable for island and coastal environments, with particular emphasis on small units (<25 MWth) with large storage. These units are ideal for remote areas or areas connected to low power grids. The first major experiment carried out at the PROTEAS unit concerns the development of a pilot / experimental scale infrastructure for the cogeneration of electricity and desalination of seawater using solar energy.

After successfully completing the first experiment, the facility was upgraded with the installation of additional forms of renewable energy sources, such as photovoltaics and wind turbines, to carry out the next major research project on multi-generation from renewable energy sources. The main goal is to allow storing and using power without operational interruption both on and off the grid. Finally, the unit has two pilot units from two international industries (one Czech specializing in the CSP sector and one American in the desalination sector). Both are fully integrated into the existing infrastructure.

The Human Skeleton

How active were our ancestrors? What were their dietary habits like, how healthy were there and how mobile? All this information can be extracted from the human skeleton, using appropriate research tools. ‘The human skeleton: a window to the past’ includes different activities for an audience aged 5 to 15 years. These activities will show you what an osteoarchaeologist’s job looks like from the stage of excavation to the stage of laboratory analysis. In specific, you will learn the main principles of an archaeological excavation.

Subsequently, you will have the opportunity to determine if a human skeleton belongs to a man or a woman, how old he/she was, how active and whether he/she suffered from any diseases, exactly as an osteoarchaeologist does in the lab.

How Does Water Flow

When water flows from the mountains to the plains, it converges or diverges based on the shape of landforms. The distribution of water leads to watersheds which play an important role in our agro-ecosystems and determine the availability of water resources. The dynamic behavior of watersheds is demonstrated with an interactive augmented reality sandbox, where participants are able to change landforms and explore in real time the importance of water relative to the study of hydrology and earth sciences.

Furthermore, researchers will demonstrate how irrigation scheduling and water conservation can be achieved with the use of soil moisture sensors. Audiovisual material will also broadcast smart recipes and procedures to adapt our water resources and cities to climate change.

Zoo-Archaeology

Almost wherever we dig, we find animal bones. Why are there so many in the soil? What happened to the animals they once belonged to? What can they tell us about the life of humans in the past? Zooarchaeology is the key with which we can unlock the knowledge hidden in the ancient animal remains, answer these questions and many more. With a set of fun activities, suitable for both children and adults, there is ample opportunity for first-hand experience in being an archaeologist specialised on animal remains, in other words a zoo-archaeologist!

The activities involve discovering bones and teeth, handling them, guessing which body part it is, which animals they belonged to and how people interacted with those animals. All activities are practical and interactive, such as excavating and handling animal remains, with handouts and visual aids to practical work. The aim is to show the practical aspects of zooarchaeology, as well as the knowledge produced by it. All activities are conducted by experts, which offers opportunities for further discussion and learning.

U-Solve

U-SOLVE is a one-of a kind, European funded project that calls for ‘creative’ ideas and solutions to urban sustainable challenges. The implementation of the United Nations ‘Sustainable Development Goals’ in urban areas is of outmost importance for making our cities sustainable, liveable and resilient over the long term. The U-SOLVE project and its framework are simultaneously being implemented in 6 Mediterranean countries (Italy, Greece, Cyprus, Jordan, Palestine, Egypt) and intends to create the right conditions and ecosystems in these geographical areas for sustainable change.

In Cyprus and having as a ‘place-based’ focus the city of Nicosia, U-SOLVE’s representatives CyI and UCY have managed, through various different activities and initiatives, to study and understand the urban business and entrepreneurial environment. This study has allowed for the exposure and documentation of the most pressing and serious urban sustainable challenges that require urgent attention and action. Focusing on three Urban Domains – Waste Management, Energy and Built Environment, Urban Fabric Design – the Project is looking for ‘creative’ ideas and solutions, mainly from young people and women entrepreneurs, that can support new and/or existing efforts for sustainable and integrated territorial development. Interesting aspect of U-SOLVE is the attention it gives to creative industries and representatives.

The Project’s framework depends on entrepreneurial and innovative people from the creative industries to think of solutions that can positively influence behaviours and a culture that is resistant to change. In addition to ideas and solutions, the Project aims to generate and establish a number of urban hubs. These hubs will represent a powerful tool, at Mediterranean level, where local policy-makers, knowledge providers, development agencies, innovators and impact investors will come together and act as a community for change, producing economic value within a sustainable development framework. Entrepreneurial ideas and experimental pathways resulting from U-SOLVE related interventions will transform into successful, long-lived businesses that are fully supported by governmental entities. These businesses and their offerings are the sustainable development solutions that cities like Nicosia are looking for and need.

Illuminating Emissions

Illuminating Emissions: Simulating a Model Grid Using Mobiles How does modelling work to inform us about air quality, and short-lived and greenhouse gas pollutants? Visitors can use the light from their mobiles to illuminate the emissions from a stencilled projection of Cyprus, and explore the projections at different scales. Accompanied by a chart to interpret the results, this activity will introduce visitors to the capabilities and limitations of mathematical models to simulate air pollution that serve as the platform for gathering data in weather, air quality and long-term climate activities.

Untangling Emissions: Using Data and Yarn to Build a 3-D Emissions Web Where do different pollutants and greenhouse gases come from? Emissions are constantly produced by all of our activities¬; from the cars we drive, to the crops we grow and the livestock we raise. In order to model and interpret emissions for the purposes of understanding our atmosphere in both the short and the long term, scientists must first determine the type and size of emissions from different sources. Visitors can use various colourful threads to help construct a 3-D Emission Web that traces pollutants back to their various sources. This activity will help visitors visualize the inventories atmospheric scientists use daily to inform us about our weather, climate, and health.

Modelling the Real WorldThe basic pillars of science are theory and experiment. Theoretical studies are also facilitated by simulations or ‘computer experiments’. Simulations allow us to study phenomena in greater detail at a reduced cost. For example, for any material (gas, liquid or solid), we can compute important properties and its behaviour under varying conditions by simulating it in different time and size scales, ranging from the quantum- to the macro- world. Despite this, with an increase in the demand for more technologically advanced materials, more detailed simulations are needed which in turn require more computational power.

Simulations can run for several months, but with the use of supercomputers, we can ‘split’ the computational problem in parallel processors, making calculations much faster. Finally, by simulating using various parameters which may be nearly impossible to do with real experiments (mainly due to exorbitant costs), we can optimize products (e.g. strength of new materials).

 

The Digital Library for the History and Culture of Dress in Cyprus

The DIGITAL LIBRARY for the HISTORY AND CULTURE of DRESS in CYPRUS facilitates the study and dissemination of the history of the Cypriot dress in its broader socioeconomic and cultural context. Dress in Cyprus includes the apparel of the Greek Cypriots, who represent the majority of the population, as well that of the Turkish Cypriots and the Armenian community in Cyprus.

Utilizing the available written, visual and material evidence, primary focus is given to the periods of Ottoman and British rule in Cyprus. During this time the development of Cypriot dress mirrored aspects of the cultural identity, the daily life and the socioeconomic aspirations of the various strata of Cypriot society as they transitioned between the insular realities of Ottoman Cyprus and the island’s gradual Europeanization in the colonial context of the British Empire.

The use of advanced digital technologies and applications offers a unique approach to an important aspect of Cypriot Cultural Heritage. The project is an integral part of the framework of Dioptra, the Cyprus Institute’s digital library for Cypriot Culture. This is the first comprehensive attempt to utilize the great opportunities offered in the field of Digital Cultural Heritage for the study and dissemination of the history of dress in Cyprus. The public will be able to approach the digital documentation, 2D and 3D imaging and database applications that contributes to the creation of a web-based digital platform that virtually narrates and explores the cultural development of the Cypriot dress.

Visiting an Ancient Cypriot Field

The main aim of the proposed activity is the exploration of the plants’ presence in ancient Cyprus. The participants will learn which types of domesticated plants were used; how the ancient Cypriots treated them- from their planting and harvesting to their processing for storage and meal preparation. The children will also learn which food combinations did the ancient people and which was their favorite foodstuff to eat either as a snack or as a main dish.

The participants will have the opportunity to explore Cypriot plant remains found in archaeological sites of the island using a stereomicroscope. They will also be able to go through atlases devoted to Cypriot flora and recognize already known to them plants as well as introduce themselves to new species. Before they leave our booth, they will be asked to draw a sketch or even compose a brief story presenting their experience after visiting the ancient Cypriot landscape. We hope that through their visit to the archaeobotanical booth they will have not only gained a glimpse of the past Cypriot flora, past diet but also they will be able to compare the past with the modern diet and underline differences and similarities.

Cypriot Medieval Graffitti

The workshop of the Cyprus Institute “Medieval Graffiti in Cyprus: history scratched on the walls” aims to raise awareness about the presence and the relevance of the Medieval graffiti of Cyprus. Visitors will have the opportunity to explore past people’s messages recorded on church walls, to see how researchers document and study them applying innovative technologies to recover the graffiti meaning and value.

Through different activities, visitors will get closer to graffiti creation, documentation, and interpretation, learning about a usually unexplored aspect of the rich Cypriot cultural heritage.

Computational Based Science

In the last decades, with the rise of computers and their complexity in terms of architecture (with the largest of them being called supercomputers) and computational power, scientists have been enabled to use tools to complement and many times replace the laboratory experiments.

We want to take you on a trip from the first computers (abacus in Ancient Greece) to applications in the modern (pre-exascale and quantum era) through simple computational experiments. We will demonstrate how a supercomputer and a quantum computer can perform complex calculations applicable to a variety of scientific domains from unlocking our very existence through Lattice QCD simulations to designing materials. Did you know that we compute pi through the use of random numbers? Or how fast a supercomputer can calculate? Join us in this superquantumcomputing adventure! We promise you it will be Crayzy (supercomputing pun there)!

Nutty Scientists

The Nutty Scientists are thrilled to participate with the scientific show called the “Ice Age Show”, which aims to awaken the curiosity of children towards science subjects using fun experiments with Carbonic Ice such as “Dark mist”, “Fill the Bottle”, “Rising Bubbles”, “The High-Pitche Ladle”, “Boom!”, “A Foam Bath” and more…
The kids will help our scientists over-come incredible challenges within the secret forest of Merlin the Wizard by performing amazing experiments. They will learn about the amazing properties of CO2 and dry ice getting to know about sublimation, chemical reactions, pressure, density, weight, osmosis and more…

The show will take place in the inside room of Skali Aglantzias and it will be free of charge, as part of the Nutty Scientists Cyprus support to the sCYence Fair 2022. Limited sitting will be available so mark your calendars to join us!

Cyprus Amateur Radio Society

Our aim is to promote the involvement of youth in STEM subjects by providing a real-life example of how STEM can be applied in an easy and fun way from the comfort of one’s home. Through amateur radio the study and further development of the art of wireless communications is promoted. We shall setup the following experiments:

  1. An HF radio station that will be used to communicate world-wide, and at the same time demonstrate how and what factors affect radio wave propagation through the ionosphere, by observing in real-time the reach of our signals from the sCYence fair.
  2. A mock satellite will be ‘flown’ above the Scyence fair, which shall wirelessly transmit telemetry information (and possibly photographs) to an earth station, and visitors will have the opportunity to witness how a satellite ground station works, using cheap and off-the-shelf materials readily available.
  3. A web-browser based electronic training application that aims to help people learn the Morse Code in an entertaining and fun way.
  4. A simulation of a ‘Slow-Scan TV’ station will be setup, which shall allow visitors to observe how the initial pictures from the moon were sent to earth during the Apollo moon landings. For those who wish, they may even have the opportunity to send their own pictures.

The activities will be coordinated by Nestor Jacovides. More info related to the CYPRUS AMATEUR RADIO SOCIETY (CARS) are available here

Physics Decathlon

The Physics Decathlon is an experiential activity with ten interesting Physics experiments for young and old. Each experiment ("race") has a measurable result. Thus, visitors can experiment and check how well they do in these experimental activities and, at the same time, learn about concepts and laws of Physics.

The activity has a competitive character in two categories: group category (in which groups of students with a maximum number of 5 members participate) and individual category (in which any visitor of the Festival can participate). Teams and individuals compete in interesting experimental Physics activities with measurable results and, depending on the result, get points. At the end of the Festival, the champion team in the team category and the champion in the individual category will be announced. The winners receive a small prize, related to Physics. Visitors who do not wish to take part in the competition can simply try the experiments while attending the Physics Decade booth.

Indicatively, some of the Physics Decathlon competitions are:

  • Needle Balance: Participants should balance as many needles on the head of a needle as possible.
  • Transfer of balls with an overturned glass: Participants should transfer from the table to a glass 10 balls (one ball at a time) using another glass, which, however, must be constantly inverted.
  • Lifting a clip with a magnet: Participants should lift a clip that is tied to the end of a thread as high as they can using a magnet with the restriction that the magnet does not touch the clip).
  • Sphere Emergence: Participants must raise a metal sphere from the bottom of a closed test tube filled with sand to the surface of the sand, without opening the tube (and without using a magnet!
  • Balance pins in water: Participants should place 20 pins on the surface of the water in a glass so that the pins do not sink.

 

Educational Robotics

General introduction to the field of robotics and the fields in which it finds application in everyday life with reference to educational robotics (STEAM) which includes the sciences Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Mathematics as well as the benefits it offers. There will also be an introduction to the practical part as educational robotics combines the model of Experiential Learning. Experiential Learning helps students find solutions by using their hands while activating most of their brain, as recent research shows. At this point students will be able to build and program robots with the appropriate instruction of the instructor. Students will get their hands on basic parts of a robot such as engines, sensors, etc. They will then assemble and build some of the attached structures and program them via tablet.

The activity is coordinated by Gregoris Hadjilarkou (Mechanical Engineer, Department of Mechanical and Construction Engineering) and Foivos Hadjilarkou (Electrical Engineer - Energy Technologies and Sustainable Design).

Demonstration of Robotics Challenges of the Robotex Competition by the Cyprus Computer Society

Robotex Pancyprian Robotics Competition is an annual event organized by the Cyprus Computer Society with the support of public and private organizations, in accordance with the respective International competition.

At the sCYence Fair booth, representatives of Robo.com.cy and Engino, both partners of CCS and sponsors of Robotex Cyprus, will present examples of the challenges of the popular competition, which this year will take place on 24-26 June 2022, information at www.robotex.org.cy

Educational Robotics

The non-profit organization Achievement Foundation for Talented and Gifted Youth has secured the copyrights to organize in Cyprus, the largest robotics competition in the world, the First Tech Challenge, which involves teams from High Schools, Lyceums and Technical Schools. The winners from Cyprus advance to the grand final in Houston, USA.

The FTC competition differs significantly from all other robotics competitions. Requires teams to collaborate with each other, make a presentation to a panel of judges, and answer questions from other judges in the pit area. Throughout the competition, other judges without a distinctive jersey will supervise the team members regarding their behavior towards their classmates, as well as towards other teams. The FTC competition also inspires teams to get involved in social work. In addition, the teams write an engineering notebook, where they show the whole process from design to implementation of their robot. Based on all these parameters, the teams have the opportunity to win various prizes, in addition to the winner of the robotic part of the competition.

The first 12 schools have already been trained for FREE, a total of 39 teachers. Other FREE teacher training at the hardware and software level will be arranged, so that they can become the educational mentors of the teams in the schools they teach.

Register your school via email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call at 22 208 702, so that your teachers can be trained in the next series of training programs that will be organized soon.

Nutty Scientists

Asteroids pose a regular threat to our planet. In 1908, an asteroid flattened a massive area in Siberia. More recently, in 2013, another exploded over the city of Chelyabinsk and just last month, on the 12th March, another exploded north of Iceland. Are we in danger of being wiped out like the dinosaurs? What measures are being taken to protect us? Could there be another side to asteroids that can benefit our planet?

The lecture will be delivered by George A. Danos, President, Cyprus Space Exploration Organisation (CSEO), Vice-Chair, Panel on Innovative Solutions, International Committee on Space Research (COSPAR) Academician, International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) Honorary Member, International Astronomical Union (IAU) President, Parallel Parliament for Entrepreneurship, Republic of Cyprus.

Demonstration by Robotex

An award-winning group of students from Paphos, who represented Cyprus in this competition will showcase on the stage of sCYence Fair their robots with the use of robotics tracks. The aim of the demonstration is to explain how they prepared and how they won their peers from all over the world in the popular robotics challenges SUMO, Line Following and Folkrace. It is noted that the students had conquered the respective challenges in the Pancyprian competition Robotex 2021, which this year will take place on 24-26 June 2022, information at www.robotex.org.cy

16:30 - 17:00Awards Ceremony - Winners Announcement and Speeches by the Organizers for the Closing of sCYence Fair 2022

 


 

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